Gan

Laamu Atoll


Haddhunmathi or Haddummati Atoll (Laamu) is an administrative division of the Maldives. It corresponds to the natural atoll of the same name. It is mostly rimmed by barrier reefs, the broadest of which are topped by islands. There are many islands along its eastern and southern boundaries. This atoll is teardrop shaped with the projection of the reef at its NE corner (Isdhū Muli). It closely resembles Kolhumadulhu, its neighbour further north. Owing to its typical atoll shape, it differs in no respect from atolls in the Pacific Ocean, save for its greater size. Its reefs are generally of little breadth, with no signs of vilu (deep pools), except for its eastern fringes which are covered with islands that are quite large by Maldive standards.

Haddhummathi Atoll forms the southern limit of Central Maldives. Beyond the Huvadhu Kandu, the broadest channel between atolls in the Maldives, lie the southern atolls. Traditionally, Maldivians call this atoll simply 'Haddhunmathi', without adding the word 'Atholhu' at the end. Before that the name of the atoll was 'Sathu Dhuvu mathi' named after the seven main islands.

Diving Maldives - Laamu Atoll


Diving season is open all year round with the calmest conditions from December through to June. Laamu Atoll is an untouched paradise for snorkelers and divers. With relatively few channels, great visibility, beautiful hard coral formations and weak currents, this perfect for photographers. Inner reefs are home to both small macro and larger animals such as turtles. The channels to the north provide adrenalin-charged current diving for the more experienced. These channels are packed with fish, sharks and eagle rays while on the outer reef; we may encounter mantas and turtles.

Visit Gan Island


The island Gan is on the eastern fringes where most islands in the Laamu atoll are located. The island Gan is cuddle up with astounding beaches. Laamu Atoll Gan is the longest island of the Maldives with the linked causeways stretching up to about 18 kilometers in length making up the longest stretch of dry land in the Maldives.

People of Laamu Atoll are friendly people. In Laamu Atoll the land is plentiful compared to the rest of the islands in Maldives and farming was the major economic activity until recently. Fishing with the development of factories in the region is emerging and the tourism in Laamu is evolving with the introduction of Guest houses in the local island. The island also has impressive mounds from a pre-historic Buddhist time. The mounds known as “Hawitta” a pyramid like structure built in pre-Islamic times and have a history of over 600 years.

Tourism in Gan


Gan is the largest island in the atoll and in the Maldives. The island is on the eastern fringes where most islands in the atoll are located. The island Gan is nestled with astounding beaches.The island also has impressive mounds from a pre-historic Buddhist time. The mounds known as “Hawitta” is a pyramid like structure built in pre-Islamic times and have a history of over 600 years. Away from home, experience the unique and the unspoilt natural environment of the beautiful Maldives through our adventure holiday tour. This opportunity will expose the visitors to the Maldives history, culture and livelihood engulfed in the natural marine environment, where Sun, Sand and Sea form the frame of this unspoilt paradise.

Historical ruins


There are large ruins from the historical Maldivian Buddhist era. A ruin called “Gamu Haiytheli” is situated on Mudhin Hinna in the Mukurimagu ward of the island. It is 91.5 m in circumference and 7.3 m in height. Local tradition says that this was the last Buddhist temple of the Maldives. Ruins called “Munbaru” in an area called Kuruhinna. These were investigated by H. C. P. Bell in 1923 and a report with photographs was published in his monograph of 1940. The ruins in Gan were the best preserved ruins from the Buddhist past in the Maldives when H. C. P. Bell excavated some of the island's Buddhist remains, especially one of the stupas and a vihara at Kuruhinna. Recently, however, much vandalism has taken place at those unprotected sites and only scattered stones and mounds of coral rubble remain.